"Ugh, troll bogies!"

Monday, 26 June 2017 13:05
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[personal profile] marnanel

[This was the review of “Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone” I posted on June 8th 1999, shortly before the release of “Azkaban”.]

It's been quite a while since I enjoyed a previously unread children's book as much as I enjoyed HP&TPS. At first, the book did seem to skip through genres quite jerkily: I think the introduction, an ugly-duckling story as with the start of, say, James and the Giant Peach, was a bit too long for a section so separate from the rest of the story. But the mystery part was excellent and I never guessed the secret. (It's an interesting point that there's no way you can be really evil if you have a stammer.) Considered as a school story... I'm not sure I can tell: the conventions for stories about boys' schools and girls' schools are so different, and good stories (such as this one) about co-ed schools are correspondingly so rare. Perhaps this is just my limited experience.

Incidentally, I wonder how much she was influenced by DWJ. The idea of the Ministry of Magic is very similar to Chrestomanci's department (though with different motives); you could perhaps draw (a few) parallels with Witch Week.

The description of the first few days at the school did get slightly irritating, because your attention kept being summarily drawn to a rapid succession of things which were (or seemed to be) just for show, without any obvious use in the story (e.g. the Choosing Hat): it was rather as though the author had invited you over to show you her holiday snaps. This is one of the places where I'd draw unfavourable comparisons with the subtle way DWJ has of doing the same thing; nevertheless, there are lots of good little ideas used well, with Diagon Alley and the Every Flavour sweets being especially memorable.

A few oddnesses: I'm sure Hermione's logic puzzle has more than one solution. The bizarre HM turned without warning into a bizarre moralist beside the Mirror of Erised (though you could draw comparisons with his behaviour by Harry's sick bed). Quidditch was rather run to death. Were there really no half-decent people in the whole of Slytherin? And by the way, I'm fairly sure I remember reading in Brewer that the Philosopher's Stone was pink and crumbly, not scarlet... hmm!

But it's also been a while since I've slowed down towards the end of a book because I know I'm going to miss the characters (cf. the Neverending Story). So I think I'll look out for the sequel... besides, I want to know whether Harry & Hermione get together :) . I'll certainly be recommending this to people I know who are sensible enough to want to read it.

[And a small claim to fame: AFAIK I was the first person to try to create a Harry Potter newsgroup.]

Ridiculous comment of the day

Monday, 26 June 2017 03:24
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
In response to this article:

White people are the only reason schools ever desegregated in the first place, so making broad generalizations here doesn't work.

0.0

That's some impressive ignorance there. I just... I don't even... wow. Thurgood Marshall must be absolutely spinning in his grave.
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
we certainly have a lot of classic cars. Not just old cars, but old in very good condition and the sort that even people with no real knowledge of cars (hi!) can say "Wow, that's a nice looking car!" over.

Yesterday when I walked the dogs with Eva, we passed one such car with a front bench seat.

Me: That's a nice car!
Eva: It's weird, it doesn't even have two seats in the front.
Eva: Wait, it has three seats. COOL! So you can have six people in the car! Why don't they do that now?

I didn't know the answer, but here it is. They were an option for much longer than I thought! I'd assumed they were regulated away, but apparently not. Whodathunk? (Random tangent - I wonder which is more common in English, "whodathunk" or "whodathunkit"? Google ngram viewer is completely unhelpful here.)

Anyway, today I saw three nice Cadillacs from the 50s or 60s... though given that they were all together, there was probably a thing they were going to. And last week I ran across an Oldsmobile that I'm pretty sure is from the 40s.

So as you can see, we do have a lot of classic cars in this neighborhood that you might randomly run across.

**********************


Chatter in the deep brain spurs empathy in rats

The day after Sweden switched from driving on the left to driving on the right, 1967 (LOL!)

'50s Ladies in Kodachromes: Looking Back to Women Fashion Over 60 Years Ago

Chickens may illuminate how humans developed sharp daylight vision

The story behind the dark Times Square subway poem (Yo, that's a really long tunnel, btw.)

Mosul celebrates first Eid without Islamic State in years (I didn't know henna was an Iraqi thing, but judging from those pictures I guess so...?)

Eid al-Fitr: What you need to know (Starting this year, NYC schools take off for Eid, but they're doing it tomorrow. And then I think school ends Wednesday. This is typical of the NYC school system. It'd make just as much sense to not take those two random days off in June and then end the year last Friday, but noooooooo. Don't know why I'm complaining, I don't have to deal with that nonsense, anyway.)

Muslims in Asia pray for peace as Ramadan holy month ends (There is a girl in one of those pictures wearing a red hijab with white polka dots and Minnie Mouse ears. It is so adorable, it must be seen to be believed.)

A Middle Eastern Spin On A Classic Latino Dessert: Rose Cardamom Tres Leches (Tres Leches is apparently quite popular in Turkey nowadays anyway.)

This Common Butterfly Has an Extraordinary Sex Life (Extraordinary and a little stomach-churning.)

Famous Women Have Been Defying Gender Norms and Rocking Menswear for Years

Gay pride parades sound a note of resistance - and face some

Stories About Disability Don’t Have to Be Sad

Planes aren’t the only things with wings buzzing at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

The base was the first military installation to earn the “Bee City USA” designation: The number of pollinator honey bees swarming around hives has flourished five fold in two years as the bees indulge in abundant food, water and nesting sites, officials say.

Philippine, Vietnam navies play sports on South China Sea island

The decline of electric guitar

Websites and apps are designed for compulsion, even addiction. Should the net be regulated like drugs or casinos?

Joe Arpaio on trial over immigration actions echoing Trump's

A Battle Over Prayer in Schools Tests Canada’s Multiculturalism

A risky fix to repair a city's gutted streetlight grid

The TSA is going to look through your books but promises not to notice what you're reading (When we talk about things that we should never have accepted as normal, the TSA and their shenanigans is top of the list.)

Journalists Condemn Trump Press Restrictions, But Don’t Expect Them To Boycott Briefings

Two factories Donald Trump bragged about saving are now laying off workers

Canadian leaders have given up on Trump—so now they're going around him

Shifting Dollars From Poor to Rich Is a Key Part of the Senate Health Bill (No shit.)

Pro-Trump group's health care offensive warns GOP senators to get in line

The Danger of Yemen's Secret Prisons (Content note: like all descriptions of torture, this is nauseating)

Skeleto venas

Monday, 26 June 2017 06:25
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Posted by Ridejo

Skeleto venas al kuracisto kaj la kuracisto diras:
"Nu, sinjorino, vi venas frue..."

Comic for June 26, 2017

Monday, 26 June 2017 23:59
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conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
The first link that popped up on Google is no longer functional, and it doesn't work at archive.org either. The correct link now is https://theauthoritarians.org/

That's easy to remember!
[syndicated profile] vintage_ads_feed

Posted by bradygirl_12

Something a little different. To give you the lowdown on The Steel Helmet, Ben Mankiewicz and TCM introduces the movie. A gritty movie with startling starkness, as the film was released only six months after the start of the war.

As the film opens, veteran Sergeant Zack is seen crawling away as the only survivor of his squad (executed by the North Koreans). The hole in his helmet is proof of his luck, though this World War II vet is suffering from PTSD (known then as battle fatigue). Trying to get back to his lines, Zack meets up with a Korean boy he dubs Short Round (the inspiration for the boy of the same name in Indiana Jones & The Temple Of Doom) and a patrol also trying to get back to American territory.

The film includes scenes of an unarmed North Korean prisoner being shot (which infuriated the U.S. military), and frank discussion of race relations back home (black and Japanese). While the modern civil rights movement wouldn't get its catalyst until Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on that Montgomery bus for another four years, the Army was struggling with integration as ordered by President Harry Truman. Neither scene is the focus of the film, but they are startling considering that the war was currently raging and race relations were just not addressed very often by Hollywood.

The Korean War produced its share of flag-waving films, but more often the movies were grim, gritty depictions of war. World War II films were often intended as recruitment films. It was only after the war that war's futility and waste were addressed. Gene Evans is stellar as Sergeant Zack.

This film is considered one of the best war films of all time.

I am a rose

Sunday, 25 June 2017 22:02
marnanel: (Default)
[personal profile] marnanel

This is the first of our rose plants to flower.
The plant's name is Sheila.


I've been growing roses all my life.
I wear a necklace of rosewood.
In many ways, I am a rose.

Roses aren't naturally climbing plants, like bindweed or grapevines. They must be cared for, and bound to a structure. And I've learned that I need to give myself a structure, or I can't naturally climb.

I am a rose.

Roses need work. They must be pruned. The pruning is painful, but without it they won't flower.

I am a rose.

Nobody cares about dog-roses, nobody notices them, but they grow wild wherever they please. The popular roses that everyone admires are sterile and can't spread: they survive because they're grafted onto a dog-rose root. The roses nobody cares about are the roses that keep the others alive.

I am a rose.

I grew up near one of the biggest rose nurseries in the country, so everywhere there was me, there were roses too. I fell into many a rosebush while I was learning to ride a bike. I carefully grew one up the side of the house, a yellow rose with a mind of its own: soon I had to leave it to its own devices because it had grown taller than my arms could reach.

I am a rose.

When I was about six I had a dream of a concentration camp. I had been imprisoned, along with many other humans, by gaseous aliens who lived on methane. The armed guards would float around our cabins and the parade ground, terrifying us as much as they intimidated us.

Of course when you're sent to the camps, they take everything away from you: all your property as well as your dreams and your name. But I'd smuggled in one memento: a small twig of rosewood. I kept it in the pocket of my grey uniform and squeezed it tight whenever I was homesick.

One day I realised that roses have thorns. And that was the day I used the rosewood to burst and kill the guards at the gate, and run free into the outside world. One small piece of reality had torn a hole in the nightmare.

I am a rose.

bob: (beard)
[personal profile] bob posting in [community profile] flaneurs
Hello,
As is customary I did Flaneurs bus challenge I. (c) from the same stop as before with an unchanging n of 6.
In exciting news I managed to finally cross the river and in fact ended up at Tottenham Hale. I covered about 30 miles on buses on the hottest day of the year. The routemasters were hellish.


* Map
* Google Photos or Flick Photos depending on what you prefer. Includes lots of video.
* Twitter thread


I'm currently uploading the videos to youtube and may make a longer video of them.
Talking of which I often post videos of my bus journeys on my youtube channel

This week's upcoming events...

Sunday, 25 June 2017 16:00
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Posted by misstia

A reminder will be posted a day before each event

28 Wednesday ONE DAY EVENT: Reptiles. Ads that have reptiles

30-2 Friday - Sunday Weekend EventS: Poisons and Fingers & toes. Ads for poisons and/or that mention poison AND ads featuring fingers and/or toes!!

[community profile] drawesome

Sunday, 25 June 2017 11:00
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[personal profile] goss posting in [site community profile] dw_community_promo
We are a Multi-fandom Drawing community for FanArtists. If you enjoy drawing fanart, using either traditional or digital media, we would love to have you join in the fun. :)

Drawesome on DW
[community profile] drawesome: A Drawing Community for Fan-Artists

Korean War Veteran's Day

Sunday, 25 June 2017 14:26
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Posted by misstia

Many thanks to our guest host bradygirl_12 for our Korean War Veteran's Day. We do this event, now yearly, because as she said, the Korean War is quite often forgotten. Sandwiched between WWII and the Vietnam War, it's just a blip in many history books and the veterans are also overlooked. Whether it be 6 months, 6 years, or 3 years, as the Korean War was (1950-1953), it should not be overlooked, nor should any veteran who served be forgotten.

Ad from 1952

6e717fd76b227fb4aa4e053747df77f0--coke-ad-coca-cola-ad

That ad, for some reason, automatically reminded me of this scene from Dr. Strangelove.

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Posted by bradygirl_12

Good morning!

Today is the 67th anniversary of the start of the Korean War ("Isn't this where we came in?" "It's even Sunday morning!"). And it was a Sunday that it began, as the film's dialogue attests. I am your guest host for this event..

One Minute To Zero stars Robert Mitchum and Ann Blyth in a film released in 1952, with a year to go in the Korean War. A mix of flag-waving and gritty realism, the movie is most noteworthy for actual combat scenes and a controversial scene involving Korean refugees. Howard Hughes, the owner of the studio (RKO), refused to delete the scene when requested by the U.S. Army.

25 Sunday ONE DAY EVENT: Korean War Veteran's Day. Any ad from the period of the Korean War. This war, and it's veterans, is often overlooked.

Heartland, Part 6 (Americana)

Sunday, 25 June 2017 10:28
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Posted by Twelve Mile Circle

All things must come to an end and eventually the Heartland adventure approached its natural conclusion. I enjoyed my brief sojourn through the American Midwest, captured some new counties, ran a few races, viewed some sand dunes and canyons, and drove through more miles of farmland than I could count. I still had a few things to talk about though. They didn’t fit neatly into my other categories so I collected them here at the end.

Mid-America Windmill Museum


Mid-America Windmill Museum

I mentioned the lack of attractions in northern Indiana that led me to the East LaPorte Street Footbridge in Plymouth. My search also uncovered the Mid-America Windmill Museum. This prompted a stop in Kendallville (map), which the docent at the museum pronounced as Kendaville. The first set of double-l’s seemed optional.

I didn’t know quite what to expect. How fascinating could a bunch of antique water-pumping windmills be? Actually I rather enjoyed it. Premium models filled a restored barn. Others stood sentinel in a field behind the barn, whirling in the wind as they’d done on farms decades ago. It was both hypnotic and wonderful. Windmills manufactured by the Flint and Walling company dominated the collection. In fact, the museum preserved an example of every Flint and Walling model ever produced. This company started making its windmills in Kendallville in 1866 and sold them for nearly a century. Amazingly, the company still existed and celebrated its 150th anniversary recently. It anticipated the drop in demand for windmills and switched to electric pumps.


Speaking of Windmills


Heartland Marathon Series - Day 4

Two days later we came across another windmill, a more traditional version like ones seen in the Netherlands. I saw a different windmill called De Zwaan last year in Holland, Michigan — which made sense — after all, they called the city Holland. It seemed rather out of place in Fulton, Illinois. However, I learned afterwards that a lot of Dutch settlers came to Fulton in the latter half of the 19th Century. A windmill fit within that cultural heritage. By the way, just because I’ve seen a few windmills lately doesn’t mean I’ve found another object to count compulsively. I don’t need any more lists.

This one had a name too, De Immigrant. It differed from the windmill in Michigan because of its contemporary nature. While authentic, it wasn’t old at all, having been dedicated in 2000. Artisans crafted the windmill in the Netherlands and shipped it in pieces to Fulton. Then they assembled the windmill on-site, atop a levee overlooking the Mississippi River (map). De Immigrant ran exactly like a vintage windmill. Visitors could purchase flour ground by the windmill in a nearby visitors center.


Thriller!


Michael Jackson House

I try to visit at least one place mentioned in Twelve Mile Circle during every trip I take. One article, Where They Lived as Children, featured the home where Michael Jackson grew up. It fell directly along our route. I had to stop there.

Gary, Indiana might lag only behind Detroit for urban decay. The United States Steel Corporation founded Gary in 1906 as a home for its workers. Gary thrived for decades until the steel factories started closing in the 1960’s. Nearly 200,000 people lived there then. Only 75,000 people live there now. We drove into Gary and it looked like a disaster site, with abandoned buildings collapsed upon themselves, empty lots filled with weeds and trash, and car-rattling potholes on terribly rutted roads. Even so, it seemed perfectly safe to stop at Michael Jackson childhood home and pay my respects. I couldn’t imagine how the Jackson parents and their ten children fit into that tiny house (map).


Presidential



I noticed the Jackson house sat on Jackson Street. That seemed to be a fitting tribute, however it turned out to be just a coincidence. The Gary street grid aligned to Presidents of the United States in order of their administrations. This particular Jackson got its name from Andrew Jackson, not from Michael or any of the other musical Jacksons. Right around this same time I got an email from reader "Steve" curious about presidential street names so I took it as a good omen. He also wondered if any street had been named for Donald Trump yet. Oddly, I’d encountered a Trump Avenue in Canton, Ohio only a few days earlier even though I doubted it correlated directly to The Donald’s time as president. It seemed to predated his nascent Administration.


American Pickers


American Pickers

Do any 12MC readers watch American Pickers on the History Channel? The premise is pretty simple. Two guys drove around rural America from their home base in Le Claire, Iowa in search of antiques. They hunted through basements, barns, abandoned buildings, and any other place where valuables might be hiding within junk and debris. Gary, Indiana might be a good place to try. They haggled with owners over a price and hopefully got a few treasures to sell through their company, Antique Archaeology. I noticed we could get to Le Claire in about a half hour from Clinton, Iowa where we’d raced earlier that morning.

Those of you familiar with the show probably recognized the derelict Nash Statesman automobile and the shop behind it. Those appeared on the show fairly regularly. Of course we stopped for awhile (map); that’s how I got the photo. One thing surprised me. The magic of television made it seem like the shop must be located way outside of town all by itself, maybe surrounded by cornfields or something. That wasn’t the case. It sat right in the middle of Le Claire just a short block away from the main road. I could walk to a brewery, a distillery and at least a dozen shops in about two minutes from there.


Buffalo Bill


Buffalo Bill Cody

Le Claire included other surprises such as the Buffalo Bill Museum. I didn’t know that Buffalo Bill Cody hailed from Iowa. I figured he must have come from somewhere much further west. No, indeed, he came from Iowa. The museum included an exhibit on Buffalo Bill, as one would expect, although the largest space featured a ship called the Lone Star. This paddle-wheeled towboat operated under steam power on the Mississippi River for a century. The Coast Guard finally forced it out of service in 1968 when it couldn’t meet safety standards anymore. Fortunately preservationists managed to save the Lone Star and constructed an entire building to show it off.

Le Claire and surrounding Scott County thought highly of its most famous son. In addition to the museum, we visited the Buffalo Bill Homestead a few miles outside of town (map). He grew up there from the time of his birth in 1846 until about the age of seven.


Articles in the Heartland Series:

  1. Why, oh Why?
  2. How Not to See a City
  3. Foiled by Memorial Day
  4. Beyond Covered
  5. Not Just Farmland
  6. Americana

See Also: The Complete Photo Album on Flickr

The post Heartland, Part 6 (Americana) appeared first on Twelve Mile Circle.

Events of note

Sunday, 25 June 2017 10:04
rmc28: Rachel smiling against background of trees, with newly-cut short hair (Default)
[personal profile] rmc28
Last weekend we made a family visit to the inlaws in High Wycombe, for some low-key hanging-out time together for the cousins to play together and the adults to gossip.  It was Too Hot, but at least every train on the way home had aircon, as did the taxi.  We experimentally departed from Cambridge North, as we are roughly equidistant from the two railway stations.  Advantage: not going through the centre of Cambridge. Disadvantages: only one direct train per hour to London on the weekend, no cafe or shops (yet), slightly more expensive by taxi.  But it was worth conducting the experiment to be sure.

We all struggled with the heat this week.  This house does a good cross-breeze when such a thing is worth doing - this week that was usually from approx 9pm to 7am, so a lot of opening and closing windows and doors according to temperature and people being awake.  We acquired a standing fan to help. I did a lot of waking up about 5am to open things and then droop back on my bed waiting for the breeze to help. I think I'd be a lot less resentful of the lost sleep if I'd been able to be productive with the time, but no.

I went out to a PARTY yesterday and enjoyed catching up with people, and being introduced to Subjective Guess Who?  This is played using the standard board game set, but you can only ask questions which have no objective answer - some memorable ones from last night included "Have they ever played World of Warcraft?" and "Are they a morning person?".  The kibbitzing from the audience is the best part.

Going to the party was utterly self-indulgent given the state of my studying since the election. Today will probably not include much studying either, as plans already include: taking C to see Transformers: The Last Knight, attempting to get some sandals beforehand, getting in my weekly call to my mother before she gets on a bus to San Francisco, and making the cheating version of Tudor costume for C's class trip to Kentwell this week.

Mateno en kastelo

Sunday, 25 June 2017 06:21
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Posted by Ridejo

Estas mateno.
Tra malfermetita fenestro venas unuaj sunradioj en kastelan dormoĉambron.
En la lito kuŝaĉas grandega vir-rano kaj kontente fumas pipon.
En angulo de la lito kuntiriĝas detruita princino kaj flustras: "Vi al mi mensogis..."

Comic for June 25, 2017

Sunday, 25 June 2017 23:59
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Much, much faster than I thought....

Saturday, 24 June 2017 21:34
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
So first, two signal boosts:

1. I found out about this via the League of Women Voters. This act, introduced in both the Senate and the House, has the stated purpose "To require States to automatically register eligible voters to vote in elections for Federal office, and for other purposes."

Among other things, it would automatically register eligible voters via information they provide to various government offices, such as the DMV. A number of states have take this kind of legislation up, and a few have passed it, but it would be wonderful to have this on a federal level, for all states.

It's S. 1353 in the Senate and H.R. 2876 in the House. Call your reps and ask them to support this act by co-sponsoring it.

What we're seeing right now in Washington with the AHCA is what happens when the elected officials are not sensitive to the needs of their constituents. To force them to care, we have to make it easier for those constituents to make their voices heard in the voting booth.


http://thisfinecrew.dreamwidth.org/98278.html

2. There is a new friending meme going around, so if you've already posted at [community profile] 2017revival and [community profile] addme and are still thinking "I need more people", you can try that. Boost it, anyway, would you? These things only work if they get shared.

Anyway, I want to get rid of my last few tabs, so bear with me.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


The Frog Log Saves Wildlife in Your Pool

Here's what happens when lightning doesn't hit the ground

The Last Picture Show

America’s Short-Lived ‘Black Army on Wheels’

What vampire bats can teach us about cooperation

The Green Energy Revolution Will Happen Without Trump

The fact is: Facts don’t matter to climate deniers

The Canadians helping refugees start anew

What's the Problem With Al Jazeera?

White People Keep Finding New Ways to Segregate Schools

London tower blocks evacuated as 34 buildings fail fire tests

Insurers Battle Families Over Costly Drug for Fatal Disease

Trump won't hire poor people for a top post - many Americans agree

Science Says Summer Is Going to Be Ruined for Many Years to Come

How Charlottesville, Virginia’s Confederate statues helped decimate the city’s historically successful black communities.

To Make Sense of American Politics, Immigrants Find Clues From Lands They Left

Venezuela's Maduro confronts perils of his reliance on the military

Bill Cosby Is Planning Town Halls About Sexual Assault And The Law, Spokesman Says (Gross!)

'No doesn't really mean no': North Carolina law means women can't revoke consent for sex

Nursing Home Workers Still Posting Nude and Vulgar Photos of Residents on Snapchat

Psychologists Open a Window on Brutal C.I.A. Interrogations
[syndicated profile] depressioncomix_feed

Thank you for the incredibly kind words. I don’t know if this comic makes the world a better place but I do know that communication does, and if we can just keep talking about mental health in a constructive way I think we can truly improve our world and our understanding of these issues.

conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
Took Finn to the groomer again. I like for him to look like people love him.

Last time, they just had to shave it all off. There wasn't much choice, and so they didn't ask what I wanted. I get that. This time they did ask. "Do you want him to look like a poodle?" "Isn't he already a poodle?"

Yes, but now he looks more like a poodle. I didn't think it was possible.

I've been amusing myself and occasionally annoying everybody else by crooning "You are so poodle-ful to meeeeeee" at him ever since.

*************************************************************


Why the Amish Are Building America’s RVs

To Remember Random Errands, Turn Them Into a Story

Teenage boy from Mumbai slum dances way to NY ballet school

A Serbian Farmer Wants To Protect The Balkan Donkey By Selling Its Pricey Milk

I am Lionfish, hear me ROAR!

Ramadan? There's an app for that.

The Once-Common Practice of Communal Sleeping

What Mormon Family Trees Tell Us About Cancer

America’s hungriest wind and solar power users: big companies

The unsustainable whiteness of green

Teens Are Having Sex Later, Using Contraception, CDC Finds

11 Ways That I, a White Man, Am Not Privileged (just read it)

How Europe could be the unexpected beneficiary of America’s fall from global grace

FEMA Is Preparing for a Solar Superstorm That Would Take Down the Grid

Turkish schools to stop teaching evolution, official says

Some U.S. States Relax Restrictions On Cladding Suspected In Grenfell Tower Fire

When twisted justice stops prisoners from starting over

A New, New Right Rises in Germany

Kurds see chance to advance their cause in ruins of Islamic State

America’s cultural divide runs deep. While rural and urban Americans share some economic challenges, they frequently diverge on questions of culture and values. On few issues are they more at odds than immigration.

How Accusing A Powerful Man of Rape Drove A College Student To Suicide

The Silence of the Lambs (This article is about child rape.)

As women go to jail in record numbers, who's watching out for their kids? No one.

Politics )

Detail #343, pt 2: Differential Number

Saturday, 24 June 2017 18:25
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Posted by Miekko

One position where differential number can make sense is after numbers themselves.

In many languages, numbers are followed by singulars rather than plurals, giving phrases which, if translated morpheme-for-morpheme, would be along the lines of
five man
three ship
etc
Other languages obviously have plurals there (and some have some non-obvious case, e.g. Finnish has partitive singular for nominative and accusative NPs, and for other cases, there's agreement between the numeral and the noun. Except for nouns that lack singular forms altogether, the noun is in the singular, and for those nouns that lack singular forms, the noun is in the plural and the numeral also is inflected for the plural (which numbers otherwise mostly are not!)

Now, let's consider how to use this to differentiate things. One difference number sometimes can contain is that of a number of things being seen as a number of individuals, or as a group containing some number of members. Imaginably, a singular noun after a numeral would be more likely to indicate groupness, whereas plurals would be likely to indicate an individuated plural. However, collectives vs. singulatives imaginably would go the other way in languages that have those.

Further, of course, one can consider the interaction of this with determiners like many, some, etc. Here, we get two possibilities: maybe plural by itself indicates individuated plurality, and collective plurality needs some kind of pluralizing particle in combination with a singular root - so many mother would signify '(a group of) many mothers), whereas mothers would signify several mothers acting without coordination. On the other hand, we could imagine that words like many could overrule the plural's individuation, and so many mothers would signify mothers as a group. Again, the collective-vs-singulative situation could provide the very opposite interpretation, where the collective itself implies groupness, but some extra particle indicates individuation; or the singulative with some particle indicates individuated plurals.
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Posted by Miekko

One of my faithful readers asked for a meatier description of the thing I described in the previous post. Here goes.

Let's consider a system that can be decomposed into four binary features, A, B, C and D. Let's pretend we're building a verbal system, so this is some kind of TAM++ system we're describing. So, let's consider what the four things could be:
A: transitive vs. intransitive
B: perfective vs. imperfective
C: past vs. non-past
D: irrealis vs. realis
However, the markers do not simply mark a single feature at a time, so the markers that exist may be:
א perfective + transitive + realis + past
ב past + perfective
ג irrealis + intransitive
ד transitive
ה past + intransitive
ו imperfective + intransitive

The idea is there should be more of these, but working out a nice system is tedious so I skipped that bit. With the system above, if you want to express transitive irrealis, you have to construct it using ג and ד - irrealis intransitive + transitive, where transitive overrules the intransitive bit of the previous morpheme. Thus the system is fusional, in part, and agglutinating in part.

Science articles

Saturday, 24 June 2017 13:30
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
So, went out to walk the dogs earlier. Everything was going great, until Moonpie found a patch of grass. It looked to me to be identical to all the other patches of grass, but not to her....

Moonpie: YAY! Grass!
Me: C'mon, we're on our way home now!
Moonpie: Sure, sure, but hold on, I gotta roll around here.
Me: C'mon!
Moonpie: Busy flopping around like a dead fish!
Me: Indeed, you are.
Moonpie: LIKE A DEAD FISH!!!!
Finn: Smells good. Maybe I should take a leak.
Moonpie: LIKE A DEAD FISH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

We did eventually get home, where I found out that when Eva agreed to take out the compost for me in exchange for $7, she actually just dumped it on the ground sort of near the compost bin instead of actually in the bin. She's not getting her $7, and I don't care what she says, that's plenty fair.

**********************


While trust is inherited, distrust is not: study

Massive, ‘Dead’ Galaxy Puzzles Astronomers

Bioengineers create more durable, versatile wearable for diabetes monitoring

Legal or not, more American women are opting for abortion by medication. We asked doctors: How safe is it?

Self-folding origami: Chemical programming allows Nafion sheets to fold and refold

A Better Touch Screen, Inspired by Moth Eyes

Scientists spy on the secret inner life of bacteria

Sea sponges stay put with anchors that bend but don't break

Some clouds are full of little lollipop-shaped ice crystals

How did bird babysitting co-ops evolve?

Why Do Bird Eggs Come in So Many Shapes?

Saying 'climate change' instead of 'global warming' decreases partisan gap by 30 percent in U.S.

Wave beams mix and stir the ocean to create climate

Are you forgetful? That's just your brain erasing useless memories

Cancer cells may streamline their genomes in order to proliferate more easily

This glass frog wears its heart for all to see

How a wildfire kicked up a 45,000-foot column of flames

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved

So our kitchen overhead fan broke

Saturday, 24 June 2017 11:23
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
On the downside, it'll need to be replaced.

On the upside - or, shall I say, the bright side - we all loathe that light fixture. It only takes two bulbs and the cover over the bulbs means we're cooking in the dim all the time.

*************************************


'Superhero' 3D printed hands help kids dream in Argentina (I bet!)

All the Animals That Love Touchscreens

Georgia Sheriff To Cut Sentences For Inmates Who Saved Correctional Officer

On the trail with Cambodia's tarantula hunters

As drought looms, could this team of scientists prove cloud seeding works?

How Animals Develop Regional Accents

A surgeon’s secret: As she operated on babies’ birth defects, a doctor hid her own diagnosis

A School That Provides The One Constant In Homeless Children's Lives

Pride and prejudice? Race tinges LGBT celebrations

Supreme Court limits government's power to revoke citizenship

Where Street Vendors Run Pharmacies Out of Buckets

Military heads want transgender enlistment hold

A daily conundrum in convulsed Venezuela: will my kids make it to school?

Solar’s rise lifted these blue-collar workers. Now they’re worried about Trump

Senate GOP releases bill to cut Medicaid, alter 'Obamacare'

Children of Islamic State militants in Libya reunite with families in Khartoum

'Buried alive': the old men stuck in Britain’s prisons

Coffee under threat. Will it taste worse as the planet warms?

Ethiopia's Coffee Farmers Are 'On The Front Lines Of Climate Change'

Mounting evidence that Trump’s election was aided by Russian interference presents a challenge to the American system of government—with lasting consequences for democracy.

Rigged: Forced into debt. Worked past exhaustion. Left with nothing.

When the man who abuses you is also a cop.

How totalism works

Trained to Kill: How Four Boy Soldiers Survived Boko Haram (Skip this article if you have a sensitive stomach.)

06/22/17 PHD comic: 'Technically'

Saturday, 24 June 2017 08:34
[syndicated profile] phd_comics_feed
Piled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham
www.phdcomics.com
Click on the title below to read the comic
title: "Technically" - originally published 6/22/2017

For the latest news in PHD Comics, CLICK HERE!

Blondulino kaj policano

Saturday, 24 June 2017 15:58
[syndicated profile] ridejo_feed

Posted by Ridejo

Policano haltigas blondan kondukantinon kaj petas ŝian kondukpermesilon.
Ŝi demandas: "Kio estas tiu kondukpermesilo?"
"Ĝi estas la dokumento, en kiu vi havas vian foton."
La blondulino serĉas en la mansako kaj trovas speguleton. Ŝi rigardas sin en ĝi kaj pensas, ke ĝi povus esti tio.
Do ŝi donas ĝin al li, li rigardas sin en ĝi kaj indulge diras: "Vi tuj povus diri, ke vi ankaŭ apartenas al polico."
[syndicated profile] depressioncomix_feed

There are 7.347 billion people in the world, and you should really ask any of them before asking me for relationship advice. Whether or not it works depends on so many factors that it makes it impossible to say if it’s possible or not. To be with someone who has a mental illness is having a relationship with added challenges, and only you can say if you’re ready for those challenges or not, and it’s also difficult to say whether or not you can handle the challenges if you haven’t experienced them yet. Some relationships with people with mental health issues work, and some don’t. But in the grand scheme of things relationships work and don’t work for many reasons that do not have anything to do with mental illness. So no one can say for sure. Especially me. All I can say is that as long as you communicate, you’ll have a better chance, but understand relationships are hard no matter what the situation is.

I’ve had far more relationships in my life that failed than ones that worked, so if you’re looking for advice on successful relationships, ask one of those 7.347 billion people ahead of me.

Ŝerco aŭ vero?

Saturday, 24 June 2017 13:05
[syndicated profile] ridejo_feed

Posted by Ridejo

Kial viroj edziĝas?
.
.
.
Por ke ili povu solvi problemojn, kiujn ili alie ne havus.

Weekend Event: Cheese

Saturday, 24 June 2017 11:32
[syndicated profile] vintage_ads_feed

Posted by beaver67

Must have been a good recipe; it was cut out of the magazine from which I scanned the ad.

Weekend Event: Cheese

Saturday, 24 June 2017 11:31
[syndicated profile] vintage_ads_feed

Posted by beaver67

Large, double-page spread. Click picture for close-up for easier reading.

III. (d) in Kraków

Saturday, 24 June 2017 11:34
squirmelia: (Default)
[personal profile] squirmelia posting in [community profile] flaneurs
I arrived in Kraków on Monday afternoon and decided to do challenge III. (d), take the first left, then the second right, etc. I prefer to use the adaptation of take the first left, then take the first right, etc.

Write up and photos )

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